Move storage group path validating the destination file paths

The errata list for this fifth edition is available at A Test Suite is maintained to help assessing conformance to this specification.

This document has been reviewed by W3C Members, by software developers, and by other W3C groups and interested parties, and is endorsed by the Director as a W3C Recommendation.

[Definition: A software module called an XML processor is used to read XML documents and provide access to their content and structure.] [Definition: It is assumed that an XML processor is doing its work on behalf of another module, called the application.] This specification describes the required behavior of an XML processor in terms of how it must read XML data and the information it must provide to the application.

XML was developed by an XML Working Group (originally known as the SGML Editorial Review Board) formed under the auspices of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) in 1996.

XML has been designed for ease of implementation and for interoperability with both SGML and HTML.

This section describes the status of this document at the time of its publication. A list of current W3C publications and the latest revision of this technical report can be found in the W3C technical reports index at

It was chaired by Jon Bosak of Sun Microsystems with the active participation of an XML Special Interest Group (previously known as the SGML Working Group) also organized by the W3C.

Parsed data is made up of characters, some of which form character data, and some of which form markup.

The English version of this specification is the only normative version. In particular, erratum [E09] relaxes the restrictions on element and attribute names, thereby providing in XML 1.0 the major end user benefit currently achievable only by using XML 1.1.

However, for translations of this document, see Technology? As a consequence, many possible documents which were not well-formed according to previous editions of this specification are now well-formed, and previously invalid documents using the newly-allowed name characters in, for example, ID attributes, are now valid.

This document specifies a syntax created by subsetting an existing, widely used international text processing standard (Standard Generalized Markup Language, ISO 8886(E) as amended and corrected) for use on the World Wide Web.

It is a product of the XML Core Working Group as part of the XML Activity. As a convenience to readers, it incorporates the changes dictated by the accumulated errata (available at to the Fourth Edition of XML 1.0, dated 16 August 2006.

Leave a Reply